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Stony-Meteorites

 

 

Ordinary Chondrites

 

 

Ordinary Chondrites (H, L, LL-Chondrites)

H-Chondrites

L-Chondrites

LL-Chondrites

 

 

Chondrites of this class are considered as "ordinary" because they represent with more than 85% of all Chondrites the largest part of these meteorites. As a cosmic primeval matter, they are surely anything else than usual. Mineralogically they consist to the large part of olivines and orthopyroxenes as well as a characteristically high share in more or less oxidised nickel iron. Based on this share in iron and other mineralogical charakteristics, they are subdivided in three groups:

H-Chondrites

H-Chondrites, based on their high share of nickel iron, are equipped with the "H", that stands for "High Iron". The meteorites of this group contain a weight share of 25 to 31% iron, whereby 15 to 19% of the iron is in an unbound, metallic form. Consequently H-Chondrites are quite strongly attracted by a magnet. Petrologically the H-Chondrites encompass the classes 3 to 7, and they consist mineralogically above all of Olivine and the Orthopyroxene Bronzite. Based on this fact, they are designated sometimes also as Olivine-Bronzite-Chondritee although this name is obsolete and rarely used. Comparisons of the reflection spectrums of the H-Chondrites with the spectrums of well known asteroids yielded that the H-Chondrites possibly come from the asteroid Hebe or from a descendant of it.

 

L-Chondrites

The "L" in the L-Chondrites stands for "Low Iron", therefore for a typical iron content of 20 to 25%, whereby however only about 4 to 10% of this iron is in an unbound, metallic form. This fact causes, that L-Chondrites attracted by a magnet, but by far not so strongly as the H-Chondrites. Petrologically the L-Chondrites encompass the classes 3 to 7, whereby the class 6 is represented especially often. Mineralogically L-Chondrites consist of Olivine and the Orthopyroxene Hypersthene, what gave them also the name Olivine-Hypersthene-Chondrites. Also this name today is no longer common although one will find it often in literature. The L-Chondrites could perfectly well come from the earthnear asteroid Eros, a sky body that is examined presently intensively by the space probe NEAR-Shoemaker. The reflection spectrums correspond rather exactly, and perhaps one will soon be able to say with certainty, that the L-Chondrites are descendants of this asteroid.

 

LL-Chondrites

LL-Chondrites are the rarest of the ordinary Chondrites. The "LL" stands for "Low Iron" and "Low Metal" and takes into account that the LL-Chondrites possess a typical iron amount of 19 to 22%, whereby merely 1 to 3% occur in more metallic, unbound form . Accordingly the LL-Chondrites are only weakly magnetic. As the H and L-Chondrites also the LL-Chondrites encompass all petrological classes from 3 to 7, whereby however noticeably many, original LL3-meteorites get found. In older sources, the LL-Chondrites are designated sometimes as Amphoterites, but this name is no more common and should therefore be avoided. Concerning their origin the LL-Chondrites possibly come from the earthnear asteroid Eros and represent another place of origin on the about 20 km large mother body.

 

 

 

Carbonaceous Chondrites

Enstatite, Rumuruti and other Chondrites

Achondrites